cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Logging into 2 laptops/PC with the same account

Librarycat
Attendee

Hellol!

 

What happens if I am on a laptop/PC logged into my Zoom (business level) account, and I log in with the same account on another laptop/PC?

 

Per Zoom, "You can be signed in to Zoom on one computer, one tablet, and one phone at a time. If you sign into an additional device while logged into another device of the same type, you will be logged out automatically on the first device." 

 

In reality…what happens if "you are logged out automatically?"

 

Assume we have used Zoom registration.

 

If I am the host of a meeting in Meetings and I log in on a laptop in with the same account, does the meeting END, or do I as host just get kicked out and meeting continues with the co-hosts?

 

The same with Webinar - what happens? If I am hosting a Webinar, will the Webinar abruptly since I will be "logged out automatically" - or will the Webinar continue even though I am disconnected?

 

Thank you in advance for your knowledge!

 

@Ray_Harwood and other knowledgeable Zoom users!

3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

Hey, @Librarycat!

 

The first part of your scenario is troubling.  ONLY YOU should be logging into your account.  (By extension: ONLY ONE PERSON should be logging into any account.)  Sharing accounts is against Zoom's Terms of Service.  For virtually every reasonable scenario where more than one person needs some sort of way to do something for someone else, it can (and should) be done without sharing login credentials.  I have a complete description of what I call "the Trifecta of sharing Zoom sessions" which provides details of Host Key, Alt Host, and Scheduling Privilege.  Let me know if you'd like that info, and I can paste it here.

 

But I'll assume for a moment by "someone else", you actually do mean YOU on another device.  Zoom's support articles describe it pretty well, but you're right... there's some ambiguity in the details.  I'll approach the discussion in terms of "what happens when a Host is disconnected," since - if the new attendee becomes the meeting Host, there should be no issue.

 

In all cases of a Host attempting to leave a Meeting or Webinar, they are asked to designate a Host, and can't "normally" leave without doing so.

 

For Meetings and Webinars, if there is a Co-Host assigned and anything causes the Host to be abruptly disconnected, the session will survive and one of the Co-Hosts will be promoted to Host (no idea how it picks one over the other, if there's more than one Co-Host).  I always assign a responsible individual as Co-Host.  If the Meeting Owner (person to whom the meeting ID is attached) eventually joins the meeting, he/she is give the opportunity to reclaim Host.

 

My experience in several Webinars is that if (with no Co-Hosts) the only Host abruptly disconnects, the participants (panelists and attendees) are put into a waiting-room like state, until the Host returns.  I'm not sure how long it waits before disconnecting people.  I don't know what the parameters are of when this will happen... I can only say "I've experienced this as a Webinar attendee more than once."

 

I know I've had Hosts get disconnected for Meetings, and I think it's a little more forgiving.  It might depend on whether or not Join Before Host is enabled (which would allow people to join a meeting before the host arrives, and seems like by extension it would allow a meeting to survive the untimely departure of the host).

 

Honestly, I've not really tested it much, but that's been my experience.  Hopefully some others can tell us their experience!


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

View solution in original post

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

No worries!  Let me give you one more piece of advice.

 

Set up several additional users on your account, and leave them as Basic (unlicensed, free) accounts.  Log in with them instead!  I have "Zoom1", "Zoom2", etc., which I use all the time as attendees (just to ensure I know what the attendees are seeing and hearing) and occasionally as an additional Co-Host or participant (sometimes doing screen sharing, PowerPoint, video playing, etc.).  I have 3 devices connected into a 4-Way KVM switch: one BeeLink, one Intel NUC (very old), and an older Mac Mini.  Any devices can be used, and you avoid the issue of bumping someone off.  And they're free and stay on any event for as long as the event runs!


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

View solution in original post

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

Here's my standard "Trifecta" post with I often modify or trim down to suit the specific question being asked.

# # #

There are several scenarios for allowing someone else to host a meeting in your absence.

  1. Scheduling Privilege is normally used when there's an assistant or a colleague who will need to substitute-host often
  2. If you just need a one-off substitute and the substitute is on the same corporate account as you, the Alt-Host option might be more suited (and less work initially).
  3. If one or the other is not true (not Licensed, or not on the same account), then your only option is the Host Key method.

Note that both Scheduling Privilege and Alt-Host methods require that both accounts be on the same account and both be Licensed (paid) accounts. Only Host key will work if either of those requirements are not met.

 

See these Zoom Support articles for more information:

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362803-Using-scheduling-privilege

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/208220166-Designating-an-alternative-host

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/205172555-Using-your-host-key 

 

Scheduling Privilege Additional Info:

Scheduling Privilege can be set up one-way or bidirectionally. Often an executive just needs an assistant to be able to schedule meetings and occasionally start them in the exec's absence, so the exec sets up Scheduling Privilege to allow the assistant to do so. If two colleagues (like teaching faculty) frequently stand in for one another, then both would assign Scheduling Privilege to the other. This can also work for more than two individuals.

 

Note that the person to whom Scheduling Privilege is assigned will have an additional drop-down to display either just their own meetings, just the other person's meeting, or all of them.

 

Alt-Host Additional Info:

The alternative host must start the meeting using the join link in an email sent to them by the host. The meeting will not display in the upcoming meetings list in the desktop client, mobile app, or web page for alternative hosts.

  

Host Key Additional Info:

Essentially, locate (and if desired, edit) your Host Key from your profile on the Zoom Web Portal. Set your meeting up with a Passcode, disabled Waiting Rooms, and enable Join Before Host (I recommend 15 minutes). Give your Host Key to your "substitute host", who will enter the room and use the Claim Host menu to become the host.


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

View solution in original post

7 REPLIES 7

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

Hey, @Librarycat!

 

The first part of your scenario is troubling.  ONLY YOU should be logging into your account.  (By extension: ONLY ONE PERSON should be logging into any account.)  Sharing accounts is against Zoom's Terms of Service.  For virtually every reasonable scenario where more than one person needs some sort of way to do something for someone else, it can (and should) be done without sharing login credentials.  I have a complete description of what I call "the Trifecta of sharing Zoom sessions" which provides details of Host Key, Alt Host, and Scheduling Privilege.  Let me know if you'd like that info, and I can paste it here.

 

But I'll assume for a moment by "someone else", you actually do mean YOU on another device.  Zoom's support articles describe it pretty well, but you're right... there's some ambiguity in the details.  I'll approach the discussion in terms of "what happens when a Host is disconnected," since - if the new attendee becomes the meeting Host, there should be no issue.

 

In all cases of a Host attempting to leave a Meeting or Webinar, they are asked to designate a Host, and can't "normally" leave without doing so.

 

For Meetings and Webinars, if there is a Co-Host assigned and anything causes the Host to be abruptly disconnected, the session will survive and one of the Co-Hosts will be promoted to Host (no idea how it picks one over the other, if there's more than one Co-Host).  I always assign a responsible individual as Co-Host.  If the Meeting Owner (person to whom the meeting ID is attached) eventually joins the meeting, he/she is give the opportunity to reclaim Host.

 

My experience in several Webinars is that if (with no Co-Hosts) the only Host abruptly disconnects, the participants (panelists and attendees) are put into a waiting-room like state, until the Host returns.  I'm not sure how long it waits before disconnecting people.  I don't know what the parameters are of when this will happen... I can only say "I've experienced this as a Webinar attendee more than once."

 

I know I've had Hosts get disconnected for Meetings, and I think it's a little more forgiving.  It might depend on whether or not Join Before Host is enabled (which would allow people to join a meeting before the host arrives, and seems like by extension it would allow a meeting to survive the untimely departure of the host).

 

Honestly, I've not really tested it much, but that's been my experience.  Hopefully some others can tell us their experience!


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

Hi Ray!

Nice to see you! I realize I was not being clear, so I edited my post. Yes, it is me logging in to two like devices. I have a PC and a laptop and I like to log in to the laptop secondarily to be able to share video and such. But...I have never logged in with the same account because I was afraid to see what would happen. I usually log in with my personal account as a panelist and as such, promote myself to co-host 🙂

 

The first thing I do is always designate co-hosts - usually 2 or 3 - in case something happens. So far, nothing has happened 🙂 We plan to test this and see what happens. I will report back!

 

I would love to see your "Trifecta" information if you would share it!

 

Thank you again for all of your help!

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

No worries!  Let me give you one more piece of advice.

 

Set up several additional users on your account, and leave them as Basic (unlicensed, free) accounts.  Log in with them instead!  I have "Zoom1", "Zoom2", etc., which I use all the time as attendees (just to ensure I know what the attendees are seeing and hearing) and occasionally as an additional Co-Host or participant (sometimes doing screen sharing, PowerPoint, video playing, etc.).  I have 3 devices connected into a 4-Way KVM switch: one BeeLink, one Intel NUC (very old), and an older Mac Mini.  Any devices can be used, and you avoid the issue of bumping someone off.  And they're free and stay on any event for as long as the event runs!


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

I didn't know we could do that - set up Basic accounts on our account. This will work beautifully.

I dream of a 4-Way KVM switch. When I share video I also think there has to be a better way than OBS.

 

Thank you, again.

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

This is the KVM switch I bought, and I love it except for the 2-second delay in monitor switching... which is more due to the monitor than anything, I think.  It's no longer available, but similar devices are shown below.  They're not horribly expensive.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B088LW1RJ3 


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

Ray_Harwood
Community Champion | Customer
Community Champion | Customer

Here's my standard "Trifecta" post with I often modify or trim down to suit the specific question being asked.

# # #

There are several scenarios for allowing someone else to host a meeting in your absence.

  1. Scheduling Privilege is normally used when there's an assistant or a colleague who will need to substitute-host often
  2. If you just need a one-off substitute and the substitute is on the same corporate account as you, the Alt-Host option might be more suited (and less work initially).
  3. If one or the other is not true (not Licensed, or not on the same account), then your only option is the Host Key method.

Note that both Scheduling Privilege and Alt-Host methods require that both accounts be on the same account and both be Licensed (paid) accounts. Only Host key will work if either of those requirements are not met.

 

See these Zoom Support articles for more information:

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362803-Using-scheduling-privilege

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/208220166-Designating-an-alternative-host

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/205172555-Using-your-host-key 

 

Scheduling Privilege Additional Info:

Scheduling Privilege can be set up one-way or bidirectionally. Often an executive just needs an assistant to be able to schedule meetings and occasionally start them in the exec's absence, so the exec sets up Scheduling Privilege to allow the assistant to do so. If two colleagues (like teaching faculty) frequently stand in for one another, then both would assign Scheduling Privilege to the other. This can also work for more than two individuals.

 

Note that the person to whom Scheduling Privilege is assigned will have an additional drop-down to display either just their own meetings, just the other person's meeting, or all of them.

 

Alt-Host Additional Info:

The alternative host must start the meeting using the join link in an email sent to them by the host. The meeting will not display in the upcoming meetings list in the desktop client, mobile app, or web page for alternative hosts.

  

Host Key Additional Info:

Essentially, locate (and if desired, edit) your Host Key from your profile on the Zoom Web Portal. Set your meeting up with a Passcode, disabled Waiting Rooms, and enable Join Before Host (I recommend 15 minutes). Give your Host Key to your "substitute host", who will enter the room and use the Claim Host menu to become the host.


Ray - GoodClix.com / aka "Old Desert Lizard"
Please mark this post Accepted if it helped you !

Excellent information, stashing away! Thank you again!